Categories > Basic Survival Skills

Emergency Contact List

Family Emergency Contact List

 

Access to family information is critical in times of stress. In an emergency, there is not time to go hunting for phone numbers, addresses, insurance policies, etc. in times of crisis. This template will help you get the bulk of that emergency contact information in one place.

NOTE: Once you have filled in this information, it is important for you to take the following steps:

    • Lock this information away in a safe & secure place that is easy for you to get to in times of emergency. You may also want to keep a copy at your workplace or with another family member.
    • Review and update this document a few times a year, as information can rapidly become outdated

 


Section 1: Contact Data for Family Members

Parent / Guardian Name 1: 


Company / Employer:


Work Address:


Work Phone:


Cell Phone:


Parent / Guardian Name 2: 


Company / Employer:


Work Address:


Work Phone:


Cell Phone:


Child Name:


Work Phone #


Home / Cell Phone:


Child Name:


Home / Cell Phone:


Work Phone #:


Child Name:  


Home / Cell Phone:


Work Phone #:


Section 2: School Information

Child Name: 


School Name:


School Address:


Main Phone:


Child Name: 


School Name:


School Address:


Main Phone:


Child Name: 


School Name:


School Address:


Main Phone:


Questions to ask your child’s school:
Will the school hold or release your child in an emergency situation?
Where will the school move your child in an emergency situation?
How will the school communicate with families during a crisis?
Does the school store enough food, water and other basic supplies?
Is there a disaster plan in effect, or any disaster policies that you need to be aware of (i.e. emergency pick up plan)?

Section 3: Medical Information

Insurance Co. Name:


Policy Number:


Phone:


Family Doctor:


Family Doctor’s Phone:


Closest Hospital:


Closest Hospital Address:


Hospital Phone:


 

Section 4: Social Security (U.S.)/ Social Insurance (CDN)#

Name:
SSN/ SIN # :


Name:
SSN/ SIN # :


Name
SSN/ SIN #:


Name:
SSN/ SIN #:


Name:
SSN/ SIN #:


 

Survival Techniques: Stranded

Stranded in Your Car: Survival Techniques

When it comes to survival techniques, in our modern age of cell phones and continuous communication, very few people consider the possibility of being trapped somewhere in their car for an extended period of time. Most of us, when encountering car trouble, simply call up the nearest tow truck or roadside assistance organization. While it is true that many highways have adequate cellular coverage, there are still parts of the country that are too mountainous or remote for a guaranteed cellular signal; and there’s always the chance of being stranded with a dead cell battery. Unfortunately, remote areas are often the same ones that are hit by the kind of inclement weather that can leave you stranded. In the case of a regional weather catastrophe, such as a heavy snowstorm or flooding, even if you can get in contact with rescue services, it could be hours or days before they can get to you with any help. It is important to make sure that your car is outfitted with a survival kit that can help keep you comfortable and safe during these situations.

SHELTER
Your car will most likely provide you with excellent shelter against snow, wind and rain. It is water-tight and provides a decent amount of insulation against the cold. However, over the course of a night or even a couple of nights, you will need a way to stay warm without running the car. Your vehicle will only have a limited amount of fuel, and you can’t leave it idling continuously. A good survival technique is to run the car for a few minutes every half hour or hour, depending on the temperature – enough to keep the cabin warm and not have the engine ice up. In addition, you should keep a couple of blankets in your trunk – one for each person you normally have as a passenger. It is always a good idea to have spare gloves, hats, socks and smaller items that can be put over limbs and digits to keep them warm as well.

HEAT
Some people bring a can of Sterno as an emergency heat source. This is an effective solution for camping, but in a car it can be dangerous, as there is often no place for the noxious fumes to escape. If you do burn Sterno in your car, make sure to leave the windows down enough for ventilation.  Many people find that this requirement is enough to negate the heating factor of the fuel, and so they opt for chemical heat packs. These heat packs can be placed in your boots, gloves and pockets to help keep your body warm. They are a vital part of your car’s survival kit.

CAR EMERGENCY KITS
Once you are warm, there are a few other basic needs you should attend to. The first is food; keep a small supply of energy bars, trail mix and nuts in the car with you. Since you won’t be able to cook in your car, you will want enough calories to keep you warm and alert. Storing water in your car in the winter is a bit tricky – you may very well have to defrost it with your car heater, or break off chunks of ice and suck on them. Remember that ice contains more water than snow, pound for pound, so if you have to venture out to seek water, prioritize ice. In addition to food and water, your kit should ideally contain a small LED flashlight, an extra pack of batteries, and road flares so your car can remain visible even if it gets buried in a ditch or a snow bank. You will also want to keep a small folding shovel, a first aid kit to deal with any scratches or headaches, road salt for getting unstuck and a pocket knife.

GETTING HOME
The first rule of getting rescued is to stay where you are for as long as possible and make yourself visible. This means a fire, flares, anything you can do to be seen. If you need to travel to get out of your situation, bring your emergency kit with you and layer on your extra clothing. be sure to leave a note on the dash of your car telling people which direction you have gone in. Don’t forget your cell – you may find an area close by where it works.

Survival equipment doesn’t have to be elaborate to be useful.  All of these items will fit in the trunk of your car, and can go a long way towards helping you deal with an emergency situation while out on the road.

Survive with CPR

Basic Survival: Why You Need to Learn CPR

(ARA) – When she spotted the dying man, Desiree Rossi took action when no one else would.  Although a crowd of adults surrounded the collapsed body near Desiree’s bus stop in Pawtucket, R.I., they were frozen – but not her. Rossi ordered an adult to call 9-1-1 and then she started CPR. She was 17.

Paramedics arrived and took the man to a local hospital where he was stabilized.

“I couldn’t believe that no one stepped in – that it took a 17-year-old kid to be the one to take action,” says Rossi, who had been trained in CPR just six months earlier at her high school.

Rossi’s story illustrates a huge obstacle to overcoming the dismal survival rates from sudden cardiac arrest: lack of bystander action. Less than 8 percent of victims who suffer cardiac arrest at home, at work or in other public places survive. And fewer than one-third of cardiac arrest victims gets CPR from a bystander.

“Getting people to act when someone suffers sudden cardiac arrest is critical to the victim’s survival,” says Michael Sayre, M.D., chairman of the American Heart Association’s Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee. “Time is not on the victim’s side. Four to six minutes is the window of opportunity for someone to act before it is too late.”

The American Heart Association wants more people to take action and help cardiac arrest victims. The association is helping create the next generation of lifesavers at Bethebeat.heart.org, where teens can learn the basic skills of CPR and how to use an AED.

“Teens can learn how to save lives and play an important role by setting an example for their friends, families and neighbors about the need for CPR and AED training,” Sayre says. “They can also encourage the adults in their lives to learn learn CPR.”

Be the Beat features games, educational videos and interactive quizzes. Songs with 100 beats per minute (the correct rate for chest compressions when administering CPR) are also available on the website.

And the association recently simplified the steps of CPR with Hands-Only CPR. When a teen or an adult suddenly collapses, there are two easy steps: (1) Call 9-1-1; and (2) Push hard and fast on the center of the chest until professional help or an AED arrives.

Getting formal CPR training is also easier than ever. Visit americanheart.org/CPR to find a class in your neck of the woods, or order a self-directed CPR training kit at cpranytime.org to learn at your own pace.

“Sudden cardiac arrest can happen to anyone at anytime,” Rossi says. “It happens all the time. You never know when you’ll need to use CPR.”

Courtesy of ARAcontent

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